Trigger Point Therapy

Introduction
Standard Massage Techniques
Deep Tissue Massage/Remedial Massage
Sports Massage
Trigger Point Therapy
Active Release Technique (ART)
Myofascial Release
Positional Release (Strain Counterstrain)
Visceral Manipulation

What are trigger points?

Trigger points are small nodules in the muscle fibres that are hyper-irritable and when stimulated, can cause referred pain.  Injury, poor posture, overuse or overexertion of the muscles, trauma, and even emotional stress are some of the things that can cause trigger points. Anyone can have a trigger point; individuals who have migraines, carpal tunnel syndrome, adhesive capsulitis of the shoulder (frozen shoulder), backache, and/or tennis elbow are prone.  Other components can be osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and fibromyalgia.

Our chiropractors at our clinics in Chester and St. Asaph have helped many patients with trigger points.

How do trigger points develop?

When the muscle fibres are overused or stressed they start to tighten. This in turn reduces blood flow to the particular area, causing waste build-up and oxygen deprivation to arise. The muscles will then contract or shorten, and become taut, then trigger points develop.

The taut contracted muscles will pinch an adjacent nerve (called a pinched nerve). This will cause a numb, stabbing, or tingling sensation in the areas served by the affected nerve. For example, when an individual has a pinched nerve in their upper back, they may feel the numbness and tingling sensation in their arms and hands. A widespread chronic pain also develops when satellite trigger points arise.

A person who has a trigger point will feel irritation if the area is pressed which can also send out discomfort signals in other areas away from the original point. This is called a referred pain, which is one of the effects of trigger points. For instance, if a person is suffering from a headache, it may be due to a trigger point in a neck muscle. Or perhaps they are experiencing symptoms in their legs and feet, whic could be from a trigger point in their lower back.

How Does Trigger Point Therapy Help?

trigger point therapy

Trigger point therapy is a massage therapy or bodywork technique that is specifically designed to help reduce pain in muscles that are stressed or overworked. Since this involves applying pressure to the area affected, this therapy can be quite uncomfortable. Most patients agree however that the pain is tolerable.

Patients need to remember that massaging their own trigger point vigorously will only worsen the symptoms. Doing so can also cause a bruise on the skin, or worse, bruising in the deep tissues. There is a certain pressure required in order to perform trigger point massage correctly. Only experienced, qualified professionals or chiropractors should be consulted as they are able to locate the trigger points easily and have enough knowledge on how to treat them.

If the problem is new or localized, trigger point therapy can help alleviate it in two to three days’ time. However, if a patient’s trigger point symptom has been going on for a while, it will take time. How fast the therapy works depends on how long an individual has had the problem.

What are the benefits of trigger point therapy?

  • Helps relax the taut muscles and the constricted areas in it, which, as a result, will alleviate the symptoms
  • Relieves neuromuscular pain and tension
  • Decreases muscle stiffness
  • Improves range of motion and flexibility
  • Enhances blood flow and circulation throughout the body
  • Improves posture

Introduction
Standard Massage Techniques
Deep Tissue Massage/Remedial Massage
Sports Massage
Trigger Point Therapy
Active Release Technique (ART)
Myofascial Release
Positional Release (Strain Counterstrain)
Visceral Manipulation

, , , ,

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. Massage and Other Hands On Techniques: Introduction - April 19, 2017

    […] Standard Massage Techniques Deep Tissue Massage/Remedial Massage Sports Massage Trigger Point Therapy Active Release Technique (ART) Myofascial Release Positional Release (Strain Counterstrain) […]

Leave a Reply